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FAQ

 

In November 2000, the Province of Ontario transferred the responsibility for the administration and prosecution of provincial offences to the County of Northumberland. This transfer was part of the Province's strategy to realign provincial and municipal roles in the delivery of public services. As a result, the County was required to establish its own administration, courtrooms and prosecution services to deal with charges laid under the Provincial Offences Act.

 

What does Provincial Offences Court do?
The Provincial Offences Court is the place for:

  • payment of provincial offences fines
  • provincial offences trials
  • resolution meetings with the Prosecutor
  • walk-in pleas of guilty with submissions as to penalty
  • filing of Provincial Offences Act Part 1 reopening applications
  • filing of applications for extension of time to pay
  • general inquiries about provincial offences

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How to pay fines?

Fine payments may be paid in person, by mail or by phone or online at Links to online payticket.ca                                


Please note: "Debit Visa " are not available online or telephone payments at this time. 

To pay in person our office is located at the lower level of the Courthouse Building located at 860 William Street in Cobourg, Ontario. We accept cash, VISA, MasterCard, debit, money orders, bank drafts, and personal cheques. Please note that N.S.F. cheques are subject to a $45.00 fee and will be added to your fine.

To pay by mail please address the envelope to:

County of Northumberland
Provincial Offences Office
860 William Street, Lower Level
Cobourg, Ontario
K9A 3A9

                                    

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What are provincial offences?
Provincial offences are non-criminal charges, primarily issued by the police, including those committed under
the following:

  • Highway Traffic Act - such as speeding, careless driving, or not wearing your seatbelt
  • Compulsory Automobile Insurance Act - such as failing to surrender your insurance card or possessing a fake or invalid insurance card and driving without insurance
  • Liquor License Act - such as being intoxicated in a public place or selling alcohol to a minor
  • Trespass to Property Act - such as entering premises when entry is prohibited or failing to leave a
    premises after being directed to do so. 
    Most provincial offences charges result in out-of-court fine payments. Citizens issued with provincial offences tickets should read them carefully for a complete list of their payment and trial options.

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What are the different types of provincial offence notices?
There are three different types of provincial offences notices. A Part I notice is a ticket that is issued to an individual, a Part II notice is a parking infraction, and a Part III notice is a summons with no set fine and a mandatory court date.

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Who can give out provincial offence notices or tickets?
There are a number of different types of charges that are covered under the Provincial Offences Act. As a result, there are many enforcement agencies in Northumberland County who can issue you a ticket, including, but not limited to the following:

  • Cobourg & Port Hope Police Services
  • Fire Departments
  • Ontario Provincial Police
  • Municipal By-Law Enforcement Officers 
  • Ministry of Transportation
  • Ministry of Environment
  • Ministry of Labour
  • Ministry of Natural Resources
  • Ministry of Health
  • Workplace Safety and Insurance Board

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How many days do I have to respond once I receive a provincial offence ticket?
Within 15 days, you must choose one of the 3 options indicated on the back of your ticket:

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Why are there two amounts on my ticket?
At the bottom of every ticket there are two different amounts shown, the set fine and the total payable.
You are required to pay the Total Payable amount. The difference between these two amounts is called a Victim Fine Surcharge. This surcharge is legislated by the provincial government and is added to every fine that is issued under the Provincial Offences Act. Proceeds from the surcharge will be used by the Provincial Government to maintain and expand services to victims of crime.

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What if I need more time to pay a provincial offences fine?
If you need more time to pay a provincial offences fine, visit the Provincial Offences Court office and complete the prescribed form for an extension of time to pay the fine. This form will require you to fill in all of the information regarding your ticket including how much you have paid so far and a specific date that you would like it extended to.

Notification of the approval or denial of the extension application is not sent to you and it is your responsibility to contact the POA administration office within 3-5 business days to request this information.

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How much do I owe in fines?
To find out how much you owe in fines, call or visit your local Provincial Offences Court office. You should have the offence notice number, file number or your driver's license ready, so that one of our client service representatives can assist you.

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I don't agree with the outcome of my trial, how do I get a new one?
After you are convicted at your trial and you do not agree with the Justice of the Peace's decision, the only way for you to get a new trial is to file an appeal with the Superior Court office. You will need to complete all of the necessary appeal forms and submit them to the office (within 15 days after you are convicted for Part I and Part II offences or within 30 days after you are convicted for a Part III summons to court).  Forms can be obtained at the Provincial Offences office but must be filed with the Superior Court.

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I just found out that my driver's license is suspended, why? And, how do I get it back?
If you fail to pay a Part I or Part III fine and you have not requested an extension of time to pay or your due date has passed, your driver's license may be suspended and a $20.00 fee is added to your fine. You should be notified of this suspension by a letter from the Ministry of Transportation. Failure to receive notification by mail of your conviction and/or suspension notice does not constitute grounds to dispute your license suspension. In order to get your driver's license back you will first need to pay all fines that are holding it under suspension, at any Provincial Offences Court office. Then take the receipt that you receive after payment to any Service Ontario office, show them your receipt and pay them the $180.00 reinstatement fee that is mentioned in the letter. Your license should be reinstated within three to four days and you will receive it back in the mail. You should check with the MTO before you start driving, just to ensure that your license is re-instated.

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How many demerit points do I have?
The demerit point system is administered by the Ministry of Transportation (MTO). For driver and vehicle information, you should contact your local MTO office.

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