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Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) Plan

Ash tree removal

Northumberland County is working with contractors to remove Ash trees above 10 centimeters in diameter from County roads as part of a 10-year plan to remove and replace hazardous trees. Work will begin in the fall of 2018 on County roads in the Town of Cobourg and the Township of Hamilton.

The Emerald Ash Borer Management Plan is in response to the presence of Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) in Northumberland, an invasive beetle that kills Ash trees. Learn more about EAB by reading our Fact Sheet.

Why is the County removing Ash trees from County roads?

Ash trees throughout Northumberland County are dead or declining, either due to EAB infection, or as a result of weather-related stress or native tree pests. The County is removing these trees for reasons of:

  • Hazard removal: dead and declining trees can pose a hazard to the public, as they are at greater risk of falling and causing damage or injury.
  • EAB containment: wood will be quarantined for one year to ensure it is free of infection before being released, so that EAB is not transported to another region.

How many trees are being removed in my area?

Please review our map, which outlines the number of Ash trees to be removed by section of road.

When will trees be removed from County roads in my municipality?

Crews will begin removing hazardous trees from County roads in the Town of Cobourg and the Township of Hamilton in the fall of 2018. Based on the progress made this year, timelines will be set for tree removal throughout the remainder of the County.

Will downed trees be replaced?

The County will be partnering with the Ganaraska Region Conservation Authority (GRCA) on a program to make saplings available to Northumberland residents to plant on their properties, free of charge. This program will subsidize 12,000 trees annually (60,000 trees overall), or approximately 10 replacement trees for every one tree being removed. Applications will be available on the GRCA website before the end of 2018, with trees distributed in the spring.

 

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